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I can't enlarge the photo to get a really good look, but I don't see any signs of damage or repair to the apron - no separation of the welded seam, paint or heat damage from repairs, etc. I haven't had my fender liner off, but based on the photo of the damaged fender it doesn't look like it intruded far enough to contact the apron. It appears that the brunt of the impact was on the driver's front tire and the body damage was limited to cosmetic damage. If I saw more damage to the headlight or front bumper areas I'd suspect damage to the apron as well.

Things that would concern me based on the impact would be damage to the driver's side frame rail, primarily in the area of the control arm and strut mounts, but it sounds like the shop didn't find anything there. I would look for any fresh paint, pull marks, or heat marks in those areas just in case they did repair the frame and it wasn't noted.

If the suspension was damaged to the point that the tire and wheel were forced into the firewall that could also be damaged (the firewall is considered a structural component on "combination/unibody on frame" vehicles), but unless it was significantly damaged - or if it was repaired - it likely ins't an issue. As far as the body mount issue - it could be they messed with it during the repair (was the radiator core support damaged?), or the body simply shifted as a result of the impact (look at the other body mounts for witness marks of movement).

If you can look closer at the apron and see signs of damage, then I would be concerned. The aprons play an important role in energy absorption and can affect how well the vehicle will protect you during another collision - including the timing of the airbag deployment.

Glad you weren't injured and the appearance of your truck is to your satisfaction. As long as everything else checks out okay I'd drive that sucker until the wheels fell off. :)
 
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I don't know which browser you're using but you should be able to right click on the image and open in a new tab and it will give you the full size image.
The fender was pushed into the fender apron, it moved a lot more than the picture makes it look like. There is one place, in front of/below where the air intake comes through, where there was obvious visible damage, but that was so minor it didn't really concern me. What does concern me is that it looks to my eye like there is some deformation around the hole where the air intake comes through the apron (which is directly behind the major caved in area of the fender in the pictures I posted) - My concern is that any buckling/deformation/crease there could compromise its integrity in a subsequent collision, which is why I was trying to find something to compare it to.
Thanks - I can normally just click on the image to see the full size version but didn't have the option this time. Didn't think about opening in a new tab... :)

On the larger version I do see what appears to be two dents near the hole towards the front (left) side of the image - one looks like it came from inside the engine compartment and has some bare metal exposed and the other below it from the inner fender area. Neither of these would concern me as far as structural integrity - I would shoot some paint on the bare area though to ensure no rust/corrosion starts.

I think I see what you're referring to near the air intake - above the air inlet and forward (left) of the stamped "L"? For comparison, I just pulled my fender liner down a little and took a photo (best possible I could get by cramming my phone and hand in there;)), and it does appear that there is potentially some deformation compared to mine:

Automotive parking light Automotive lighting Hood Automotive tire Grille



That being said, based on the criteria we used when I left the auto auction, I would be hesitant to tag it as "structural damage" as it is not kinked and has not been repaired. I would, however, do - or have - a very thorough inspection done on any surrounding components to ensure there isn't damage that isn't readily visible with just a cursory check. Look at the core support - especially in the areas where it attaches to the apron - and other areas of the apron for kinks or signs of repair (if the apron or other components were "pulled" to straighten them you will generally see clamp marks, similar to what a vise would leave), heat marks if they used a torch or similar to help form the metal, etc.

If nothing else is located other than what your photo shows, I wouldn't be concerned about the structural integrity of the apron.
 

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Thanks a bunch for going out and taking a picture to post here for me, I appreciate that!
Glad I could help - if you're like me it would bug me until I found one to compare it to!
 
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