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I doubt any formula1 car could get through a silt bed.
 

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So OP starts out asking about 4wd to go up a hill in Florida, flatlander from Ontario says 2wd just as good as 4wd on a snowy highway, I say BS if you have lots of snowy hills as having traction up front keeps the truck from wanting to spin out, and same flatlander goes on to talk about braking in 2wd is now better. I neither brake much on the highway, nor do I need 100% cornering at high racing speeds on snowy highways, while in 4wd. And the argument is still that 4wd won't help pulling up a hill and 2wd doesn't mean you'll spin out because of a racing instructor's better description.

Did I summarize this correct?
So, I can see why you're having a hard time understanding this.

AWD and 4wd might help you get going, especially on a hill. I agree with that, I even said it.

The reason people are spinning out is because they are exceeding the limits of what the tires are capable of. If a guy in a rwd truck spins out, it's because he was pushing too hard on the gas pedal. He should have stopped and admitted he was stuck. This is half of the argument because for each hill you go over, you have to go down to the other side. 4wd might get you over the crest, but it does nothing for you on the way down.

And what's with the "flatlander" stuff?

I doubt any formula1 car could get through a silt bed.
I agree. But that's not what this thread is about. We're discussing driving on snow and ice.
 

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Maybe you are talking about snow and ice but the op is not. Not much snow and ice in s Florida.
 

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I follow formula1. Never seen a race ran in the snow and ice.
I follow WRC. I have seen a lot of races with snow and ice.
One more thing. Why in short course off road racing are the Pro4’s faster than the Pro2’s?
 

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m_bison, if this is true, why are all rally cars AWD?
OP, remember these trucks are 4WD not AWD. Keep it in 2WD on the road unless you are on ice or in snow or mud. Rain doesn't count.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
did it a bunch today, went to a place that's 50 sqm of swamp lands and mud. Worked flawlessly, 40-50mph, easily went to and from 4wd.
 

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did it a bunch today, went to a place that's 50 sqm of swamp lands and mud. Worked flawlessly, 40-50mph, easily went to and from 4wd.
That is good to hear. Silt beds kill us. Last time we raced , we got stuck 3 times ( cracked transfer case) and killed us on time.
With NORRA there is a program that will give directions, danger zones, speed limits and silt beds etc. Comes through the intercom via IPhone.No prerunning.
Hopefully I can switch to 4 wheel drive before we hit it the silt.
 

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I switch mine to 4hi while going about 35-40 a couple times a month. On dry road, but on perfectly straight road. I always heard the transfer case should be exercised/lubricated. Some I guess are just during normal rear drive running, others need 4x4 engaged.
 

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I switch mine to 4hi while going about 35-40 a couple times a month. On dry road, but on perfectly straight road. I always heard the transfer case should be exercised/lubricated. Some I guess are just during normal rear drive running, others need 4x4 engaged.
on a setup like the f150 with locking hubs i would agree.

on a setup like our frontiers that are live all the time, 100% not needed at all.
 

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I drove about 350 miles in Wyoming last week right after a brief snow. I was switching around 60mph. The manual says 60. No problems. I tried to keep it under 70 while engaged.

I also found 4wd to help keep me more stable in the wind and with snow covering patches of ice. I could feel the rear end struggling more without it. I definitely feel being in 4hi gives me more stopping power, though I'm sure that will be argued. Down shifting is more effective in 4wd and that's the right way to slow down in snow and ice.
 

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I switch mine to 4hi while going about 35-40 a couple times a month. On dry road, but on perfectly straight road. I always heard the transfer case should be exercised/lubricated. Some I guess are just during normal rear drive running, others need 4x4 engaged.
+1
I Agree with you in doing this. i do the exact same thing. At least once a month I exercise 4x4. The most reliable machine is one that is used regularly. And you're right, there is zero risk of doing damage if you're on dry STRAIGHT roads. you can even turn a bit, the gears won't bind up unless you're in a tight turn like a parking lot.

Without using 4X4 for a long time it can actually cause damage on some vehicles, not saying it can or will on the Fronty because I don't know exactly what kind of 4x4 system it has (if front shafts are always driven etc), but i have seen lack of using 4x4 screw up front drive shaft bearings on another vehicle because the front axles hadn't spun for years. a mechanic told me this as well when we were diagnosing the source of a vibration. but i'm also aware that most people never touch the 4x4 switch for many years and have no issues, so it's one of those he said she said things.

I just looked in my manual and it says you can shift on the fly up to 62 mph "recommended". meaning you probably CAN shift on the fly faster; I'm sure if it were critical they would have programmed the computer it to NOT allow it to shift into 4wd over x mph...
 

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the herp and derp in this thread is real.

props to the guys with real world info politely speaking truth.
lol i am not so gentle.
 
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