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Well seems like they announced that the frontier will remain with the same body style which is good but powered by a new 3.8 V6 producing 310 HP and 281 TRQ mated to a 9 speed auto. They are dropping the 4 cylinder and manual tranny completely. I wonder if this new motor will be DI... I really hope not!

 

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This is only happening for 2020. in 2021, they are moving to a new body style with the new engine. Basically nissan wants to use up the current model parts...
 

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...while making a sleeper/stealthy Gen 2 w/ ~50 extra hp.
 

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Consider that this is the first year of this motor and transmission mated to an old setup... Generally speaking you don't want to buy the first year of a new redesign as they generally have more problems and on top of that, they are throwing it on the old platform.
 

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The advertised mpg bump with the 3.8 L is only 10%. Hopefully when the Gen 3 comes out next year, it was weigh less than Gen 3 leading to more mpg gains.
 

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I wouldn't buy a Frontier with that new V6 for years. Remember how long it took for Nissan to realize SMOD was a thing? Five to seven years after this new engine is out, sure, I'd buy. That may be when my '18 needs an upgrade.
 

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Consider that this is the first year of this motor and transmission mated to an old setup... Generally speaking you don't want to buy the first year of a new redesign as they generally have more problems and on top of that, they are throwing it on the old platform.
I learned that when I bought my first car... 95 Dodge neon lol

Yes it is a direct injection engine as stated in the NIssan release.
Yeah I saw that after... It's too bad. DI blows!
 

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I learned that when I bought my first car... 95 Dodge neon lol


Yeah I saw that after... It's too bad. DI blows!
Once you replaced the head gasket with the updated part, those Neons were Model T simple and reliable.

The first DI engines were kind of guinea pigs, manufacturers are starting to figure that whole process out.
 

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The initial buyers of the new 3.8 L DI engine will be guinea pigs for the reliability proof-of-concept test. DI systems have two failure points: 1) The high pressure fuel pump, and 2) Intake valve carbon build up. Everything looks good on paper and qualification tests. It is not until the general pubic uses the new DI engine with their driving habits and with the variety of gasoline sold around the world that we know the true reliability. The experiment must be done else we will never ascend to the higher mpg level. I think it took several years for the tranny SMOD to be identified. The 50 extra hp will be too enticing for some so there will be ample guinea pigs for the experiment. But for me, I will wait.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Once you replaced the head gasket with the updated part, those Neons were Model T simple and reliable.

The first DI engines were kind of guinea pigs, manufacturers are starting to figure that whole process out.
At the time I was 17 so I didn't know much about cars and was slowly learning. I beat the **** out of that car for a year and a half before the motor completely took a crap, as well as blow my tranny during that time lol

What they have figured out (Toyota) is implementing both DI and PI systems, so now you have twice the injectors lol diagnosing a bad injector will suck or once of the pumps.. It's just more parts for more headaches in my opinion.

The initial buyers of the new 3.8 L DI engine will be guinea pigs for the reliability proof-of-concept test. DI systems have two failure points: 1) The high pressure fuel pump, and 2) Intake valve carbon build up. Everything looks good on paper and qualification tests. It is not until the general pubic uses the new DI engine with their driving habits and with the variety of gasoline sold around the world that we know the true reliability. The experiment must be done else we will never ascend to the higher mpg level. I think it took several years for the tranny SMOD to be identified. The 50 extra hp will be too enticing for some so there will be ample guinea pigs for the experiment. But for me, I will wait.
Also, the issue is a lot of people have no clue how a DI system works so they have no clue what carbon build up is and when their MPG's drop because of carbon build up they usually go trade it in for a newer model. I'm certainly sure that a lot of guinea pigs will come out to have that extra power so it will be a waiting game for me as well. I'm perfectly fine with my reliable 2014 VQ40 for as long as I can keep it going.
 

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Is it port and direct injection? I see a lot of companies (Ford) doing that.

I am not going to lie, I simply LOVE the idea of an updated engine, a few more gears, and 50more HP. Lol.

I too have always been told not to buy 1st year models, but I wouldnt mind trying it out. Thats what warranty is for and if you dont put a crazy amount of miles per year than I think it would be awesome to have this body style with a new engine... I probably still wont buy it but I am VERY intrigued.
 

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Yes it is both port and direct injection, they run the port injection here and there to clean the valves. I also love the idea of an updated engine and more power but it's almost not worth it if it causes more possibility in parts to fail and more maintenance.
 

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Absolutely agree. I probably wont purchase one, but wouldnt mind if it is priced right and just hold that warranty card lol.

Also, everyone mentions the 2021 being lighter, I heard they are using same frame... are they planning to add aluminum to the body anyone know?
 

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Yes it is both port and direct injection, they run the port injection here and there to clean the valves. I also love the idea of an updated engine and more power but it's almost not worth it if it causes more possibility in parts to fail and more maintenance.
You know, people have been saying that for DECADES. Probably when Power steering and auto transmissions came out, people were already complaining about how complicated cars were getting and how "you can't work on them anymore!!!" . Hell, I'm sure when electric starters came out, some guy was complaining about it, talking about how simple and reliable a hand crank was....

When computer controls / Fuel injection first started coming out, there were issues, but, today, vehicles are better for all of it. Thinking back to my old 85 GMC 1/2 ton truck.... 305 V8, carburetor, HEI ignition, "simple truck" 165hp, 280 torque, 11 mpg.... slow, needed a carb rebuild every few years..... I don't miss it. I do, but, I don't.
 

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I'll take a 305TBI. My 2008 Cooper S Turbo was a DI engine, joint venture between the Germans and the French. That should be a first warning right there.
Turbo oil feed lines had rubber O-Rings that melted & leaked, the HP fuel pump failed ( only 1 of 2 items that they actually warrantied ), the vacuum pump was driven off the back end of the camshaft ( intake I think ) and when it puked, it would take the cam drive w/ it, the cam drives used a chain that was too thin and were endemically breaking or skipping teeth, mine was serviced twice, once under the first owner, complete replacement, and then the hydraulic tensioner again when I owned it.

The variable-drive water pump was prone to fail, and mine did, the thermostats would stick, and they were over $400.00 cause the stat was sealed in this monstrous plastic housing that looked all the world like a Jarvic Artificial Heart and had 5 liquid connections and two electrical connections. Replaced that too. The turbo system had a secondary electric water pump for bearing circulation post-shutdown cool-down cycle with a faulty pump drive electronic controller that was prone to catching fire. And they did. YouTube it and watch the barbecue. That got replaced under warranty, didn't cost me anything.

The DI didn't keep the valves clean and so eventually an intake valve coked and ruined the engine, that was the straw that broke the camel's back and shot him twice in the head. Car's long gone, so are the headaches. BTW BMW blamed the owners for all these headaches, citing "lack of maintenance", "wrong oil" etc to stave off the class-action lawsuits they so richly deserved. The owners manual said nothing but the dealer thought it completely reasonable to have to bring your Cooper in every 40k for a walnut shell blasting of the intake valves to remove all the coke, here's your $550.00 bill, thanks a bunch. My Cruise Turbo had none of these issues. Vaunted German engineering my a$$. Chevrolet did it better.

Only way I'd take a DI engine now is if its a hybrid w/ DI and port injection, only way to keep the valves clean. I religiously SeaFoamed that engine through the PCV hose straight into the intake tract, never anything less than 93Premium, fuel injection cleaner in the tank on a regular schedule, Mobil 1 5w30, great car to drive when it was running, handled like a go-cart w/ a roof, but the engine, tie a chain around it and keep your boat in place. If a Chevy EcoTec 2.0L turbo and six-speed would fit in its place, that'd be the solution. 270HP right out the gate and reliable as the day is long. BMW is off my buy list forever.

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