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Discussion Starter #1
When I start my truck the engine races as soon as I turn the ignition on. That bothers me because I’m afraid the oil hasn’t gotten a chance to circulate and lubricate the cylinders properly. After about 10 seconds the rpms lower and the engine quiets down. I recently purchased
the truck so I’m not familiar with this engine. Any input would be appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for your reply. I’m not use to hearing start like that and it worries me. Sounds like a dry start !
 

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When I start my truck the engine races as soon as I turn the ignition on. That bothers me because I’m afraid the oil hasn’t gotten a chance to circulate and lubricate the cylinders properly. After about 10 seconds the rpms lower and the engine quiets down. I recently purchased
the truck so I’m not familiar with this engine. Any input would be appreciated.
What rpm is the truck racing at when at start up?
 

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It’s purpose is to get the catalytic converters to operating temperature quickly.

Clint
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It still bothers me a little but they all do it and these engines are proven.. been around a long time!
Thanks, it’s just hard to get use to. I have a 2012 Ram with a Hemi but I guess I’m use to it and it doesn’t start like that.
 

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Some VQ40 engines are louder than others I believe. Hell, mine shoots up to 2200 on cold starts, but quickly comes to a nice quiet simmer.
 

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Like others have said, normal. Sounds worse than it is because of the fan at first. Here in the frozen north, mine will generally shoot up to 1500 as I watch the oil pressure almost top out my 100# gauge.

In contrast, my GF's Honda Civic cold starts around 800R's and will ramp up from there. It may be psychological, but I like that a lot better.
 

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Nothing I’ve ever owned has started up with this high of RPMs.
Older carbureted engines would use a temperature sensitive spring to move a cam on which the idle screw bottomed. As the ambient temperature dropped, the idle screw would get bumped up a step, significantly increasing cold idle speed. You can imagine bumping open the throttle plate by the size of these steps. Cars would easily hit 2000+ RPM, ice cold on startup. This part fits a Holley 4150, so it was on a large V-8. Just for scale, this part is probably 1-1/2" across

 

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Older carbureted engines would use a temperature sensitive spring to move a cam on which the idle screw bottomed. As the ambient temperature dropped, the idle screw would get bumped up a step, significantly increasing cold idle speed. You can imaging bumping open the throttle plate by the size of these steps. Cars would easily hit 2000+ RPM, ice cold on startup. This part fits a Holley 4150, so it was on a large V-8. Just for scale, this part is probably 1-1/2" across

Thanks for the good ol memories Ram! 👍
Im definitely familiar with the old ways! Lol. You could actually play around with them.. Still.. even old I never had one idle this high and as long before coming down off high idle. I sold my 06, it was the longest high idling but my 08 pathfinder and my 12 frontier both take what seems to be around 5 min or longer, not completely at high but dropping slowly. When I’m ready to go somewhere I’ll start it plenty a head of time just so it can go through it’s warming cycle. I know it’s not necessary but I’m one of those ol school guys that don’t believe in getting in a cold vehicle and reving it high while cold.

Thanks for the info though.. I’m sure a lot of the younger gen have not seen this type of mechanism. Now days you can hardly find the throttle under the hood!
 

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When you could adjust chokes and heaters it was not too bad. The heaters that worked off the engine warmth took the longest to kick down, the electric ones were better until they made then non-adjustable. Most of the time I would just rip the whole set-up off and replace it with a cable. As some may know, there were choke cables readily available so you could have a adjustment knob in or under the dash. Pump it twice, pull the choke and start er' up.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
When you could adjust chokes and heaters it was not too bad. The heaters that worked off the engine warmth took the longest to kick down, the electric ones were better until they made then non-adjustable. Most of the time I would just rip the whole set-up off and replace it with a cable. As some may know, there were choke cables readily available so you could have a adjustment knob in or under the dash. Pump it twice, pull the choke and start er' up.
Yes, those were the good old days when you could make adjustments like that, not anymore 👍
 

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Thanks for the good ol memories Ram! 👍
Im definitely familiar with the old ways! Lol. You could actually play around with them.. Still.. even old I never had one idle this high and as long before coming down off high idle. I sold my 06, it was the longest high idling but my 08 pathfinder and my 12 frontier both take what seems to be around 5 min or longer, not completely at high but dropping slowly. When I’m ready to go somewhere I’ll start it plenty a head of time just so it can go through it’s warming cycle. I know it’s not necessary but I’m one of those ol school guys that don’t believe in getting in a cold vehicle and reving it high while cold.

Thanks for the info though.. I’m sure a lot of the younger gen have not seen this type of mechanism. Now days you can hardly find the throttle under the hood!
If you let it run for a minute and then put it in gear the speed comes right down and you just drive away slowly and take it easy as the engine comes up to temperature. That’s what I do, interestingly with my 392 Challenger it will start high and within a couple of minutes settle right down into a normal idle. In that car with a great roar on a cold start I wouldn’t mind it going longer.
now that many/most new vehicles going to a 0 weight for cold weather temps and starts there’s even better flow at initial startup. Certainly the new 3.8 liter engine will be 0w-20.

Clint
 
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