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I thought it's usually the P-Metric SL with 4 ply equivalent walls, and C load with 6 ply equivalents? Usually the C load are considered a 6 ply equivalent but still carry less load (lower index), yet have the thicker LT tread and tougher/thicker sidewall. They are usually rated to higher pressures although that isn't really needed on a Frontier. Overall the C's, while rare in metric tire sizes, are usually considered a good option when available because they still support enough load, have thicker sidewalls, deep tread, but ride like an SL and wear like an E, only at the cost of a lower 109ish load index rating. IT's sort of like the C load tire combines the good from both E's and SLs and leaves out the bad from both. That is my understanding anyways.

I'm planning on getting the C rated 265/70R17 ATX next time. Didn't know it existed when I bought my SLs of the same tire or else I would have gone the same route.
I always just used the term passenger, which you refer to as SL. Honestly I am pretty ignorant on the ply build of the tires. You never see that listed in any of the specs so I don't reference it as I do not have anything to point to.

THe ATX is a perfect example. It comes in all 3, C, SL/Passenger, and E. Tirerack also has a pretty good spec sheet so I did a little summary. If possible I buy an SL tire, they are cheaper and carry more than the C. Been told that generally a SL is an entirely different tire than the LTs. Even the size is different enough.

General Grabber A/TX 265/70/r17
TypeLoad (lbs)Max PSICost ($)weight (lbs)thread depth (in)width (in)height (in)$/32"
C247050218.994616/328.431.613.69
SL267944176.994414/327.231.612.64
E319580221.995516/328.331.613.87
 

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Agree with everyone on here... I can see wanting them, since they would be tougher. I think not right for me, as I often drive a few hours or more before leaving the pavement and am not really set up to do more serious off-road rock crawling stuff, though I do get 'out there.' I don't really go 'off-roading' for fun, just to get to places for climbing, hiking, hunting, etc. If I change out suspension, maybe I'll reconsider.

Aired up to 45 or so, which is a little south of what the load tables recommend for our trucks. Yes, I can see airing them down from there for smoother ride. Yes, it was my fault for not researching this more, and the discount tire guys, as someone said above, went with what I requested. They are busy there and clearly understaffed. I don't blame them at all.
Well, there you go. I run 35/37 on my load range E tires. Freeway all day. If you were to air your P metric tires up to 45-50, you would also have an equally stiff ride...
 

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2019 Glacier PRO-4X 5AT
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I always just used the term passenger, which you refer to as SL. Honestly I am pretty ignorant on the ply build of the tires. You never see that listed in any of the specs so I don't reference it as I do not have anything to point to.

THe ATX is a perfect example. It comes in all 3, C, SL/Passenger, and E. Tirerack also has a pretty good spec sheet so I did a little summary. If possible I buy an SL tire, they are cheaper and carry more than the C. Been told that generally a SL is an entirely different tire than the LTs. Even the size is different enough.

General Grabber A/TX 265/70/r17
TypeLoad (lbs)Max PSICost ($)weight (lbs)thread depth (in)width (in)height (in)$/32"
C247050218.994616/328.431.613.69
SL267944176.994414/327.231.612.64
E319580221.995516/328.331.613.87
Yeah the ATX is basically what I based all of what I said on. C carries less than P/SL, but has thicker sidewalls and supports higher overall pressure, only slightly of course. Never did understand why the C is rated to carry less load, but it's kind of negligible when discussing a 4500 lb rig anyways. I do like the P/SL options and I will always choose them over E, but I do want to try the C version to compare with the P/SLs that I am running now and see what I think. The C's are definitely more expensive though and that isn't cool.
 

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Honestly I am pretty ignorant on the ply build of the tires. You never see that listed in any of the specs so I don't reference it as I do not have anything to point to.


Load (lbs)Max PSICost ($)weight (lbs)thread depth (in)width (in)height (in)$/32"
C247050218.994616/328.431.613.69
SL267944176.994414/327.231.612.64
E319580221.995516/328.331.613.87
On any DOT approved tire the load rating, air pressure, and tire ply construction for sidewall, and one for tread ply construction in both number of actual plies and what material each ply is fabricated from is req'd to be printed on the sidewall . You'll need your glasses to read it as it's the smallest printing on the sidewall, but it is always there, good info to know sometimes.
 

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4 ply 10 ply don't really apply anymore as they all only have 2 or 3 ply sidewall depending on brand.
Yep... "10-ply" these days is supposed to mean the equivalent of 10-ply back in the day... but today's 10-ply does not have 10 anything.

That said, per other comments in this thread - tire pressure, tire pressure, tire pressure.
I run my Wildpeak's at 36-psi on pavement.
 

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2020 frontier king cab 4x4
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unless I am pulling a trailer, I run my Goodyeaar Wrangler 10 plys in the high 40s psi and it gives me a good firm but not too harsh ride. They are only 245 width vs 265 and maybe that makes a difference. I like 245s better in the snow where they dig in deeper than the wider tires.
 

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Some good thoughts and experiences on here. I know a lot of people run LT load E tires without issue at lower pressures.
Exactly that - based on experience. People will run their own tire pressure based on what is best for their usage/comfort level, and what makes it more valid here is that everyone leaving feedback is commenting based on their experience using all kinds of tires specifically on a Frontier.

Take this situation as a learning experience for yourself - that there's so much more to look at in the details when choosing a tire, not just choosing a tire because they are "more durable, deeper tread" and forgetting other factors such as ride quality, unsprung weight, etc. etc.

I did find this from Toyo, addressing this specific issue: https://www.toyotires.com/media/1500/tsd-12-011_replacing_tires_on_light_trucks.pdf
Not that it is the final word but something to consider.
Probably would have been best for you to do this level of research online before you bought Load-E tires.
 

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I know this sounds like some wooowooo **** but when I first got my K/O 2's I set them to a certain psi, rolled them through mud then drove them a quarter mile on the street. Hopped out and inspected where the "clean edge" went to. I adjusted psi in the front and rear until the clean line was just before the edge, anticipating for an extra psi or two from actual road use/heat.

For me, it ended up being 34.5 in the front 33 in the rear (cold) and besides my AAL making the rear rough, I'm happy with PSI and wear over the last few thousand miles.
 

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I know this sounds like some wooowooo **** but when I first got my K/O 2's I set them to a certain psi, rolled them through mud then drove them a quarter mile on the street. Hopped out and inspected where the "clean edge" went to. I adjusted psi in the front and rear until the clean line was just before the edge, anticipating for an extra psi or two from actual road use/heat.

For me, it ended up being 34.5 in the front 33 in the rear (cold) and besides my AAL making the rear rough, I'm happy with PSI and wear over the last few thousand miles.
That's basically the chalk or shoe polish test, it really works quite well, is super super cheap and is quite effective. Seems too easy to be useful but it does work.
 
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That's basically the chalk or shoe polish test, it really works quite well, is super super cheap and is quite effective. Seems too easy to be useful but it does work.
lol, amazing! Thanks for confirming it's a legit method I almost thought I pioneered it😅
 

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Thanks for putting me in my place raine! Really needed that today! Peace out
Don't feel bad, marketing departments spend millions to understand the mind of buyers. If you attach the words "heavy duty" or "off-road" to anything, people will buy without even realizing or caring what the consequences are. If they sold a 25 ply tire folks would but it because it has More plys then tire "X" does, with out realizing it will totally destroy they're trucks handling. Everybody naturally visualizes themselves and their truck on a steep trail in the rocky mountains in their Frontier rather than stuck in rush hour traffic behind a Corolla doing 5mph.
 

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Wow, looks like i was wrong. I brought this up at cartalk.com, one of the members is an engineer at a major tire manufacturer so he is the guru when it comes to tires. He gave us another link that has all the information needed when going from one type of tire to another, and there are a lot of types of tires, who knew.


Check this out. It is a lot more in depth than the other link here. Looks like an LT should be run at about 15 psi higher than the same size P tire. The LT can carry a greater load when fully inflated to 80 psi, but at 35 psi, not as much as the same size P tire. The P tire is maxed out at 35 psi though.

Gotta go pump up the tires on the Silverado now.
 

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Wow, looks like i was wrong. I brought this up at cartalk.com, one of the members is an engineer at a major tire manufacturer so he is the guru when it comes to tires. He gave us another link that has all the information needed when going from one type of tire to another, and there are a lot of types of tires, who knew.


Check this out. It is a lot more in depth than the other link here. Looks like an LT should be run at about 15 psi higher than the same size P tire. The LT can carry a greater load when fully inflated to 80 psi, but at 35 psi, not as much as the same size P tire. The P tire is maxed out at 35 psi though.

Gotta go pump up the tires on the Silverado now.
Before people start panicking... are you sure you understood this correctly? Because the very first paragraph explains who this document is meant for (I'll highlight the really important bits):

"This guide is intended to provide assistance in utilizing load and inflation tables when replacing tires with optional tire sizes including “plus sizes” that may not be listed on the vehicle’s tire information placard (T.I.P.) or in the owner’s manual. For inflation pressure recommendations for the original equipment (OE) size, refer to the tire information placard (T.I.P.) or owner’s manual. The T.I.P. is commonly found on the vehicle door edge, door jam, glove-box door, or inside of the trunk lid"​

RED - If you are doing like a 285 on a Frontier (not OE size), this document is probably for you.
BLUE - If you have an OE size (like the most common 265/75-16, even if it's upgrading from the stock 70-series on an SV, this is still OE size) then follow the tire pressure on the sticker.
 

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I went through the tables and the weight charts on the truck and here is some food for thought. My 2020 is a 4 door/5" bed 4x2 SV with 18" wheels. The GAWR is 6012 lbs, that is the total weight of the truck with the maximum load of 1400 lbs. The max on the front axle is 3296 which is 1648 per tire, the max on the back is 3434 or 1717 per tire.

A P265/60R18 has a load capacity of 2601 @35 psi. An LT265/60R18 has load capacities of 1960 @ 35 psi, 2535 @ 50 psi, and 2690 @ 55 psi.

It looks like if I went to LT tires, same size, I can get away with 35 psi if I want to. I'd need a little over 50 psi to match the P tires.

For those with a similar truck with the standard 16" wheels, the numbers for the tires are: P265/70R16, 2403 @ 35 psi; LT265/70R16, 1820 @ 35 psi, 2335 @ 50 psi, and 2500 @ 55 psi.

Draw your own conclusions and pick the tires/tire pressure that lets you sleep at night.

BTW, I learned to drive in the 60's where the max load limit for the typical bias ply tire was around 7-800 lbs mounted on a car weighing 3500-4400 lbs. They were always overloaded back then.
 

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I have a 2019 Frontier Pro-4x Crew Cab Lux. When I switched to the KO2s I had 17k miles on my Hankook AT M and I had more than my fair share of flats (all on road). I wanted something a little more puncture resistant plus I was planning on doing more off-roading. Costco was having a killer sales on the BFG A/T KO2s so I decided to get a set. When I rolled out of there they were inflated to 50 psi. The ride was really harsh. Most of that harsh ride was from the tech not balancing them correctly. I found the sweet spot for my truck to be at 36 psi. Well my truck recently hit 22k so I took it to Costco to get them rotated. When I left noticed they were inflated 50 psi. The ride was not as harsh due to them being balanced properly but I do prefer the ride at 36 psi.

FYI - on the BF Goodrich website it says that my truck should be inflated to 48 psi.

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Product Tread
 
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