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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I got some new Toyo open country at3s at Discount Tire. Went with 10 ply, thinking they'd be more durable, have deeper tread, etc.

Not happy! They ride really rough both on and off road. Too much tire for this truck. Don't care about ride comfort but am concerned about the stock suspension holding up. I could commit to airing down every time I drive a gravel road but still harsh on road. I'd recommend these only for serious off-road duty with aftermarket suspension that can handle them. Also gas mileage definitely an issue. These are about 8 lbs heavier per tire than the 4 ply.

I don't wheel super hard but do get into loose sharp rocks and mud, etc. Could lose a sidewall but have only done that once so far. I can see the benefits of 10 ply, but I'm switching them out.

Discount Tire is taking care of me and has some ordered in 4 ply to replace them.
 

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Yeah man, tires are part of your suspension too. 10ply is pretty dang rigid lol I can only imagine on these light trucks what you experienced on stock suspension 🥶
 

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Discount Tire is taking care of me and has some ordered in 4 ply to replace them.
[/QUOTE]

Nice
 

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It's good that Discount is "taking care" of you. In all honesty they are the ones at fault here. They should should have questioned why you wanted a 10 ply tire at the time of purchase and should have warned you they would ride like having solid hard rubber wheels.
 

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It's good that Discount is "taking care" of you. In all honesty they are the ones at fault here. They should should have questioned why you wanted a 10 ply tire at the time of purchase and should have warned you they would ride like having solid hard rubber wheels.
you know they left it at " yeah bro, gnarly tires- it'll be sweet, you won't be disappointed"


..."Hey Jimmy get a load of these tank tires I'm putting on this quarter ton"
 
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Ive been on 10 ply tires for over a decade, not disappointed with them. Popping flimsy tires off road sucks; ad mentioned, you can't have the best of both worlds.
 

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Ive been on 10 ply tires for over a decade, not disappointed with them. Popping flimsy tires off road sucks; ad mentioned, you can't have the best of both worlds.
You obviously are well aware of what you were getting into and what you have.
Nothin' wrong with 10 ply rubber as long as you're aware of the penalty you're gonna pay with regards to ride. Not really fit for those who spend the majority of their wheel time on the road unless their hauling around an M1 Abrams Battle Tank in the back of their truck. If you're off-roading much of the time, creeping around at low speeds through places Uncle Josh & Aunt Millie wouldn't think of visiting then they're great. 10 plies of puncture proof and tear protection. Just sayin' ;)
 

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I run nothing but 10 ply tires on all my midsize trucks for.... hell the last 19 years I would never wheel without them. I learned my lesson 20 years ago trying to keep up with people on the trails with lower ply tires and yea that didn't work out. I have slashed countless sidewalls and punctured many treads over basically noting. I personally don't mind the slightly rougher ride that they produce. If i was looking for 100% comfort i would have bought a caddy or something not a truck.

Its a big decision of what tires to get as far as ply ratings. they way I look at it is.. changing a flat off-road SUCKS!!!

As someone else has said what PSI are you running? Some shops are really ignorant about PSI in tires and will put the max that the tires themselves say on the sidewall. I am running Milestar Patagonia MT. I found my sweet spot to be at 36 psi.. when i had them installed the shop had them at 42 PSI. its a big difference in ride quality with just 6 psi difference
 

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So I got some new Toyo open country at3s at Discount Tire. Went with 10 ply, thinking they'd be more durable, have deeper tread, etc.
...and they are, and they do.

Not happy! They ride really rough both on and off road. Too much tire for this truck. Don't care about ride comfort but am concerned about the stock suspension holding up. I could commit to airing down every time I drive a gravel road but still harsh on road. I'd recommend these only for serious off-road duty with aftermarket suspension that can handle them. Also gas mileage definitely an issue. These are about 8 lbs heavier per tire than the 4 ply.
Did you just make a guess about picking between 10-ply over 4-ply, without actually asking the salesman at Discount?
If you just said "Hi I'll take 4 10-ply tires" then they will sell you that.

It's good that Discount is "taking care" of you. In all honesty they are the ones at fault here. They should should have questioned why you wanted a 10 ply tire at the time of purchase and should have warned you they would ride like having solid hard rubber wheels.
Every time I've had a question or an issue or needed assistance with the tires I bought at Discount Tire, they've always taken care of me - no quotes.
Not all tire shops will do what they do once a sale is made.

You obviously are well aware of what you were getting into and what you have.
Nothin' wrong with 10 ply rubber as long as you're aware of the penalty you're gonna pay with regards to ride. Not really fit for those who spend the majority of their wheel time on the road unless their hauling around an M1 Abrams Battle Tank in the back of their truck. If you're off-roading much of the time, creeping around at low speeds through places Uncle Josh & Aunt Millie wouldn't think of visiting then they're great. 10 plies of puncture proof and tear protection. Just sayin' ;)
My 10-ply Wildpeaks ride fine on my daily driver, no excess road-noise, no harshness on uneven pavement. Ride much better than the KO2s I used to have, and are just as comfortable (but more "bulletproof") compared to the AT-Ms previous. Not all "10-ply" tires ride the same, there's so much more involved in ride quality than just the number of plies and blanket statements.

Just sayin' 🙃
 

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I’ve got 10 ply k02’s and my truck rides fine ? What pressure do you have your tires at? Mine are at 38 and rides as smooth as the factory hankooks
As someone else has said what PSI are you running? Some shops are really ignorant about PSI in tires and will put the max that the tires themselves say on the sidewall. I am running Milestar Patagonia MT. I found my sweet spot to be at 36 psi.. when i had them installed the shop had them at 42 PSI. its a big difference in ride quality with just 6 psi difference
I had this same thought. Discount Tire inflated my 10 ply tires to like 65 psi once…yep, they were stiff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Agree with everyone on here... I can see wanting them, since they would be tougher. I think not right for me, as I often drive a few hours or more before leaving the pavement and am not really set up to do more serious off-road rock crawling stuff, though I do get 'out there.' I don't really go 'off-roading' for fun, just to get to places for climbing, hiking, hunting, etc. If I change out suspension, maybe I'll reconsider.

Aired up to 45 or so, which is a little south of what the load tables recommend for our trucks. Yes, I can see airing them down from there for smoother ride. Yes, it was my fault for not researching this more, and the discount tire guys, as someone said above, went with what I requested. They are busy there and clearly understaffed. I don't blame them at all.
 

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My 10-ply Wildpeaks ride fine on my daily driver, no excess road-noise, no harshness on uneven pavement. Ride much better than the KO2s I used to have, and are just as comfortable (but more "bulletproof") compared to the AT-Ms previous. Not all "10-ply" tires ride the same, there's so much more involved in ride quality than just the number of plies and blanket statements.

Just sayin' 🙃
It's weird how different everyone's experiences can be. I originally went with SL Wildpeaks (115T index). Truck rode like a log wagon with those aired to only 35. I have to imagine the E versions are even worse but who knows, maybe not. The Falkens also made lots of scrubbing sensations felt in the wheel on turns and they really hit my mpg and acceleration surprisingly hard.

I switched to General Grabber ATX, SL 115T, and they ride so much better...they ride just like the stock 114T Hankooks did.

Weight of Falkens vs Generals was 47 vs 41, big difference considering they are both SL.

This was all going from the 265/75R16 stock size to my 17's and 265/70R17. Same overall diameter in the end at 31.6".

I don't know what the point of this comment really is, other than everyone definitely has different expectations. After my Falken experience I can't even imagine how bad the E's must ride but maybe they ride about the same. Either way I was shocked to see the difference in ride quality and weight between two SL tires of the same overall specs.
 

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The 10 and 4 ply, being labeled as Load E and C. If they make the same tire in a P-metric, that is often a good option. More load than a C, cheaper $, but often molded slightly different than the LT tires and the threads are slightly shorter.
 

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The 10 and 4 ply, being labeled as Load E and C. If they make the same tire in a P-metric, that is often a good option. More load than a C, cheaper $, but often molded slightly different than the LT tires and the threads are slightly shorter.
I thought it's usually the P-Metric SL with 4 ply equivalent walls, and C load with 6 ply equivalents? Usually the C load are considered a 6 ply equivalent but still carry less load (lower index), yet have the thicker LT tread and tougher/thicker sidewall. They are usually rated to higher pressures although that isn't really needed on a Frontier. Overall the C's, while rare in metric tire sizes, are usually considered a good option when available because they still support enough load, have thicker sidewalls, deep tread, but ride like an SL and wear like an E, only at the cost of a lower 109ish load index rating. IT's sort of like the C load tire combines the good from both E's and SLs and leaves out the bad from both. That is my understanding anyways.

I'm planning on getting the C rated 265/70R17 ATX next time. Didn't know it existed when I bought my SLs of the same tire or else I would have gone the same route.
 

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4 ply 10 ply don't really apply anymore as they all only have 2 or 3 ply sidewall depending on brand. If you actually had a real 1960's 10ply tire on a nissan frontier you could run it with zero air pressure and it would still look fully inflated. They went to the new load rating codes for a reason.
 
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